Blame it on the Muslims, naturally.

On the authority of Thawbaan , the Prophet said:
“The People will soon summon one another to attack you as people when eating invite others to share their food.” Someone asked, “Will that be because of our small numbers at that time?” He replied, “No, you will be numerous at that time: but you will be froth and scum like that carried down by a torrent (of water), and Allah will take the fear of you from the breasts (hearts) of your enemy and cast al-wahn into your hearts.” Someone asked, “O Messenger of Allah, what is al-wahn?” He replied, “Love of the world and dislike of death.”
[An authentic hadith recorded by Abu Dawud and Ahmad]

 

War is profitable

Defense Budget Increases

Military-Industrial Complex Speech, Dwight D. Eisenhower, 1961


Public Papers of the Presidents, Dwight D. Eisenhower, 1960, p. 1035- 1040

My fellow Americans:

Three days from now, after half a century in the service of our country, I shall lay down the responsibilities of office as, in traditional and solemn ceremony, the authority of the Presidency is vested in my successor.

This evening I come to you with a message of leave-taking and farewell, and to share a few final thoughts with you, my countrymen.

Like every other citizen, I wish the new President, and all who will labor with him, Godspeed. I pray that the coming years will be blessed with peace and prosperity for all.

Our people expect their President and the Congress to find essential agreement on issues of great moment, the wise resolution of which will better shape the future of the Nation.

My own relations with the Congress, which began on a remote and tenuous basis when, long ago, a member of the Senate appointed me to West Point, have since ranged to the intimate during the war and immediate post-war period, and, finally, to the mutually interdependent during these past eight years.

In this final relationship, the Congress and the Administration have, on most vital issues, cooperated well, to serve the national good rather than mere partisanship, and so have assured that the business of the Nation should go forward. So, my official relationship with the Congress ends in a feeling, on my part, of gratitude that we have been able to do so much together.

II.

We now stand ten years past the midpoint of a century that has witnessed four major wars among great nations. Three of these involved our own country. Despite these holocausts America is today the strongest, the most influential and most productive nation in the world. Understandably proud of this pre-eminence, we yet realize that America’s leadership and prestige depend, not merely upon our unmatched material progress, riches and military strength, but on how we use our power in the interests of world peace and human betterment.

III.

Throughout America’s adventure in free government, our basic purposes have been to keep the peace; to foster progress in human achievement, and to enhance liberty, dignity and integrity among people and among nations. To strive for less would be unworthy of a free and religious people. Any failure traceable to arrogance, or our lack of comprehension or readiness to sacrifice would inflict upon us grievous hurt both at home and abroad.

Progress toward these noble goals is persistently threatened by the conflict now engulfing the world. It commands our whole attention, absorbs our very beings. We face a hostile ideology — global in scope, atheistic in character, ruthless in purpose, and insidious in method. Unhappily the danger is poses promises to be of indefinite duration. To meet it successfully, there is called for, not so much the emotional and transitory sacrifices of crisis, but rather those which enable us to carry forward steadily, surely, and without complaint the burdens of a prolonged and complex struggle — with liberty the stake. Only thus shall we remain, despite every provocation, on our charted course toward permanent peace and human betterment.

Crises there will continue to be. In meeting them, whether foreign or domestic, great or small, there is a recurring temptation to feel that some spectacular and costly action could become the miraculous solution to all current difficulties. A huge increase in newer elements of our defense; development of unrealistic programs to cure every ill in agriculture; a dramatic expansion in basic and applied research — these and many other possibilities, each possibly promising in itself, may be suggested as the only way to the road we wish to travel.

But each proposal must be weighed in the light of a broader consideration: the need to maintain balance in and among national programs — balance between the private and the public economy, balance between cost and hoped for advantage — balance between the clearly necessary and the comfortably desirable; balance between our essential requirements as a nation and the duties imposed by the nation upon the individual; balance between actions of the moment and the national welfare of the future. Good judgment seeks balance and progress; lack of it eventually finds imbalance and frustration.

The record of many decades stands as proof that our people and their government have, in the main, understood these truths and have responded to them well, in the face of stress and threat. But threats, new in kind or degree, constantly arise. I mention two only.

IV.

A vital element in keeping the peace is our military establishment. Our arms must be mighty, ready for instant action, so that no potential aggressor may be tempted to risk his own destruction.

Our military organization today bears little relation to that known by any of my predecessors in peacetime, or indeed by the fighting men of World War II or Korea.

Until the latest of our world conflicts, the United States had no armaments industry. American makers of plowshares could, with time and as required, make swords as well. But now we can no longer risk emergency improvisation of national defense; we have been compelled to create a permanent armaments industry of vast proportions. Added to this, three and a half million men and women are directly engaged in the defense establishment. We annually spend on military security more than the net income of all United States corporations.

This conjunction of an immense military establishment and a large arms industry is new in the American experience. The total influence — economic, political, even spiritual — is felt in every city, every State house, every office of the Federal government. We recognize the imperative need for this development. Yet we must not fail to comprehend its grave implications. Our toil, resources and livelihood are all involved; so is the very structure of our society.

In the councils of government, we must guard against the acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or unsought, by the militaryindustrial complex. The potential for the disastrous rise of misplaced power exists and will persist.

We must never let the weight of this combination endanger our liberties or democratic processes. We should take nothing for granted. Only an alert and knowledgeable citizenry can compel the proper meshing of the huge industrial and military machinery of defense with our peaceful methods and goals, so that security and liberty may prosper together.

Akin to, and largely responsible for the sweeping changes in our industrial-military posture, has been the technological revolution during recent decades.

In this revolution, research has become central; it also becomes more formalized, complex, and costly. A steadily increasing share is conducted for, by, or at the direction of, the Federal government.

Today, the solitary inventor, tinkering in his shop, has been overshadowed by task forces of scientists in laboratories and testing fields. In the same fashion, the free university, historically the fountainhead of free ideas and scientific discovery, has experienced a revolution in the conduct of research. Partly because of the huge costs involved, a government contract becomes virtually a substitute for intellectual curiosity. For every old blackboard there are now hundreds of new electronic computers.

The prospect of domination of the nation’s scholars by Federal employment, project allocations, and the power of money is ever present

  • and is gravely to be regarded.

Yet, in holding scientific research and discovery in respect, as we should, we must also be alert to the equal and opposite danger that public policy could itself become the captive of a scientifictechnological elite.

It is the task of statesmanship to mold, to balance, and to integrate these and other forces, new and old, within the principles of our democratic system — ever aiming toward the supreme goals of our free society.

V.

Another factor in maintaining balance involves the element of time. As we peer into society’s future, we — you and I, and our government — must avoid the impulse to live only for today, plundering, for our own ease and convenience, the precious resources of tomorrow. We cannot mortgage the material assets of our grandchildren without risking the loss also of their political and spiritual heritage. We want democracy to survive for all generations to come, not to become the insolvent phantom of tomorrow.

VI.

Down the long lane of the history yet to be written America knows that this world of ours, ever growing smaller, must avoid becoming a community of dreadful fear and hate, and be instead, a proud confederation of mutual trust and respect.

Such a confederation must be one of equals. The weakest must come to the conference table with the same confidence as do we, protected as we are by our moral, economic, and military strength. That table, though scarred by many past frustrations, cannot be abandoned for the certain agony of the battlefield.

Disarmament, with mutual honor and confidence, is a continuing imperative. Together we must learn how to compose differences, not with arms, but with intellect and decent purpose. Because this need is so sharp and apparent I confess that I lay down my official responsibilities in this field with a definite sense of disappointment. As one who has witnessed the horror and the lingering sadness of war — as one who knows that another war could utterly destroy this civilization which has been so slowly and painfully built over thousands of years — I wish I could say tonight that a lasting peace is in sight.

Happily, I can say that war has been avoided. Steady progress toward our ultimate goal has been made. But, so much remains to be done. As a private citizen, I shall never cease to do what little I can to help the world advance along that road.

VII.

So — in this my last good night to you as your President — I thank you for the many opportunities you have given me for public service in war and peace. I trust that in that service you find some things worthy; as for the rest of it, I know you will find ways to improve performance in the future.

You and I — my fellow citizens — need to be strong in our faith that all nations, under God, will reach the goal of peace with justice. May we be ever unswerving in devotion to principle, confident but humble with power, diligent in pursuit of the Nation’s great goals.

To all the peoples of the world, I once more give expression to America’s prayerful and continuing aspiration:

We pray that peoples of all faiths, all races, all nations, may have their great human needs satisfied; that those now denied opportunity shall come to enjoy it to the full; that all who yearn for freedom may experience its spiritual blessings; that those who have freedom will understand, also, its heavy responsibilities; that all who are insensitive to the needs of others will learn charity; that the scourges of poverty, disease and ignorance will be made to disappear from the earth, and that, in the goodness of time, all peoples will come to live together in a peace guaranteed by the binding force of mutual respect and love.

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Comments

  • abumubarak  On 2010/11/19 at 06:55

    Not much needs to be said after this. War to these corporate entities is like flies on feces.

  • abumubarak  On 2010/11/19 at 07:04

    from Turning to Islam.com

    Asalamu alaikum wa rahmatullahi wa barakathuhu

    On the authority of Thawbaan , the Prophet said:
    “The People will soon summon one another to attack you as people when eating invite others to share their food.” Someone asked, “Will that be because of our small numbers at that time?” He replied, “No, you will be numerous at that time: but you will be froth and scum like that carried down by a torrent (of water), and Allah will take the fear of you from the breasts (hearts) of your enemy and cast al-wahn into your hearts.” Someone asked, “O Messenger of Allah, what is al-wahn?” He replied, “Love of the world and dislike of death.”
    [An authentic hadith recorded by Abu Dawud and Ahmad]

    In attempting to contemplate on the meaning of the Prophet’s words in the above hadith (and indeed on any of his noble sayings), one quickly comes to appreciate the Prophet’s statement: “I have been given words which are concise, but comprehensive in meaning” [Bukhaari and Muslim]. The Messenger was blessed with the profound ability to utter several words which whole volumes could then be written about.
    In this striking hadith, the Prophet describes the situation of the Muslims with great accuracy, and also prescribes a remedy for the ailment.

    “The People will soon summon one another to attack you as people when eating invite others to share their food.”
    What is extraordinary in this hadith, is that the Prophet conjures up vivid images in the listener’s mind about the scenario. Here, the Ummah (the Muslim nation) is first likened to some seemingly tasty food surrounded by a group of hungry diners. But these people need to share, and thus, the food must be divided into portions corresponding to the status of each ‘guest’.

    Shortly after the fall of the Khilafah (Caliphate), the Muslim world was divided into many different states by the European powers, with each of them eying the rich resources that Allah has blessed the Muslims with.
    Colonization and corruption shortly followed in those lands, and the seeds of tyrannical, despot regimes were planted. Now, with the Ummah divided and each government primarily concerned with its own interests, the enemies of Islam are free to attack each region like wild animals attack their prey – Palestine, Iraq, Chechnya and now Afghanistan.

    Someone asked, “Will that be because of our small numbers at that time?” He replied, “No, you will be numerous at that time…”
    This is yet more evidence that in Islam, numbers are of little significance. The Muslims were victorious: at the Battle of Badr, where the disbelievers outnumbered the Muslims three to one. They were also victorious at Yarmuk, where the Romans outnumbered the Muslims seventy to one. The current situation is quite the opposite. The Muslim population is more than a billion and is rapidly growing. Yet, these phenomenal numbers are of little consequence when the masses of the population are essentially slaves to the West, herded mindlessly like cattle according to the whims of their masters.

    “…but you will be froth and scum like that carried down by a torrent (of water)”
    Here is another image! This extraordinary description carries heavy meaning beneath its exterior if one considers the characteristics of the “froth and scum”.

    Firstly, the froth overlies the water beneath, suggesting a sense of pride and self-confidence. Secondly, the froth is almost weightless and with little substance, such that the slightest breeze can destroy it. Thus, the pride and self-confidence is ill founded and in reality, should not exist. It is only a product of self-delusion. Thirdly, the foam and scum is not in control of its path – that is, the role of the water flowing beneath. All it does is happily flow along to its destination while intoxicated with its imaginary position.

    “…and Allah will take the fear of you from the breasts (hearts) of your enemy and cast al-wahn into your hearts.”
    There were days when the forces of the Muslims were dreaded by all those who opposed them, when people from all over the world would travel to to the lands of the Muslims to receive education, and when Arabic was the language of success. These days are all but gone. Muslims and Islam are generally looked down upon. Why? The Prophet said it is because of Wahn. Technically, it means a dull lifelessness and enervation. However, the Prophet explains what this word really means:
    Someone asked, “O Messenger of Allah, what is al-wahn?” He replied, “Love of the world and dislike of death.”

    Thus, the problem and the solution have been identified. After the bombardment from capitalist and socialist ideologies, the Muslim world became too materialistic, desperately pursuing the rewards and pleasures of this world, with little remembrance of the Hereafter. The Prophet said (in another hadith): “Keep much in remembrance of death, which is the destroyer of pleasure.” [Tirmidhi]

    Allah said: “Say: ‘Short is the enjoyment of this world. And the Hereafter is the best for those who do right. And you will never be dealt with unjustly in the very least. Wherever you are, death will find you out, even if you are in towers built up strong and high.” [An-Nisaa, 4:77-78]

    Imam Ahmad records from Abu Dardaa as saying: “If only you knew what you will certainly see upn your death, you would never eat again a single bite out of a craving appetite, and you would never again drink an extra sip of water for the pleasure of unquenchable and insatiable thirst.”

    Once Muslims realise that the death is not the end, but the beginning, thereafter with ultimate justice and either excruciating torment or blissful reward, our situation will surely change.

    Until then, Allah says: “Verily, Allah will never change the condition of a people until they change what is within themselves.” [Ar-Ra’d, 13:11]

  • abumubarak  On 2010/12/09 at 07:35

    Afghanistan War Logs:
    Massive Leak of Secret Files Exposes Truth of Occupation

    By Nick Davies and David Leigh

    Hundreds of civilians killed by coalition troops · Covert unit hunts leaders for ‘kill or capture’ · Steep rise in Taliban bomb attacks on Nato · Read the Guardian’s full war logs investigation
    http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article26016.htm

    ===

    How US Marines Sanitised Record of Bloodbath

    By Declan Walsh

    War logs show how marines gave cleaned up accounts of incident in which they killed 19 civilians.
    http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article26024.htm

    ===

    Secret CIA Paramilitaries’ Role in Civilian Deaths

    By David Leigh

    Innocent Afghan men, women and children have paid the price of the Americans’ rules of engagement.
    http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article26019.htm

    ===

    Task Force 373
    Special Forces Death Squads Hunting Top Taliban

    By Nick Davies

    The Nato coalition in Afghanistan has been using an undisclosed “black” unit of special forces, Task Force 373, to hunt down targets for death or detention without trial. Details of more than 2,000 senior figures from the Taliban and al-Qaida are held on a “kill or capture” list.
    http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article26018.htm

    ===

    White House attacks Pakistan over Taliban aid

    By Declan Walsh

    The Obama administration, which gives $1bn a year in military aid to Pakistan, did not challenge the veracity of the files, but said that while Islamabad was making progress against extremism, “the status quo is not acceptable”.
    http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article26017.htm

    ===

    US Condemns Massive Leak of Afghan War Files

    By AFP

    “The United States strongly condemns the disclosure of classified information by individuals and organizations which could put the lives of Americans and our partners at risk, and threaten our national security,” said White House National Security Advisor James Jones.
    http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article26020.htm

    ===

    Afghan War Leaks Expose Costly Folly

    By Ray McGovern

    The brutality and fecklessness of the U.S.-led war in Afghanistan have been laid bare in an indisputable way just days before the House of Representatives is scheduled to vote on whether to throw $33.5 billion more into the Afghan quagmire, when that money is badly needed at home.
    http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article26022.htm

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